Monthly Archives: May 2018

N-Acetyl Cysteine Increases Free T3 in NTIS

N-Acetyl Cysteine Increases Free T3 in NTIS

References: Critical Care,

A reference to this article caught my eye when I saw the reference to NTIS which is jargon for Non-Thyroidal Illness Syndrome (NTIS). NTIS is what happens to you when you get critically ill, like with a heart attack. Your free T3 plummets and your reverse T3 rises dramatically. Just when you need it, your body goes into a perverse “antagonistic pleiotropy” cycle. Antagonistic pleiotropy is the concept that what is good for you in one environment, isn’t good for you in another. I suspect you can make the reasoned argument that Neolithic humans, when injured or ill, were well served by “hunkering down” and getting through an illness or crisis in medical care by downregulating their metabolism. That allows calories to be shifted to immune function instead of metabolic function. That remains conjecture because we weren’t there to test it. We just see the effect in modern humans.
That’s what NTIS is. Your body “Hunkers Down” in response to a crisis. In this study, the crisis was 67 patients with heart attacks. In the ICU their Free T3 and Reverse T3 were measured, and predictably they changed dramatically, shifting from regular T3 to reverse T3. NAC reversed that and improved T3.

Reverse T3 reverses T3. It blocks the action of the free T3 on your body. (Remember, T3 is the active thyroid hormone your body actually runs on. You convert it from T4, made by your thyroid. T4 is not biologically active. It’s simple the precursor template.) You feel the effect of low T3 when you get sick. You feel exhausted and can’t get out of bed. A heart attack patient can hardly lift their head off the pillow. Folks in an ICU are sick. Really sick. Can hardly move. That is the nugget of Non-Thyroidal Illness Syndrome. You get a physiological stress and your body goes into “hunker down”, or NTIS.

In this study, N-acetyl cysteine was given to the study folks in a randomized, placebo-controlled fashion. The folks who got the NAC got better and had higher free T3. What is NAC? Very simple. It is the key building block to make glutathione. Glutathione is your body’s key anti-oxidant. At age 20 you make tons of it, naturally. At age 50, dramatically less. Older, less, older, less.

Now, let’s switch to the modern era of day-to-day 24-hour stress, media, artificial light, sugar, deadlines, jerks at work – have I named enough of your stressors? Ok, add in-laws and teenagers. You feel tired all the time. Your free T3 is just too low. Could you be low in glutathione, your natural anti-oxidant? Well, NAC is the natural building block for making more of it. It is simply two amino acids plugged together, waiting for a third to be attached and presto, you have glutathione. Your stress may not be as dramatic as a heart attack, but it’s nevertheless real. Could NAC help you? I bet it could.
WWW.What will work for me. Simple. I take NAC myself. Every day. It’s on Bredesen’s lists of suggested supplements for brain health. That’s good enough for me to pull the trigger and add it to my list. I remember back when NAC was a precious, rare ICU drug to reverse Tylenol overdoses. Worked like a charm. Then it became an ER drug. Then it became a take-home drug. Then it became an OTC supplement. You can buy it yourself. This incredibly powerful building block for you to make your own glutathione is available for you over the counter. Gives you back the vital T3 for your own energy system. Isn’t that a unique cross synergy of metabolic systems?

Pop Quiz
1. Free T3 is the hormone your body naturally runs on. T or F Answer: True
2. You make less free T3 when you are under stress. T or F Answer: True. Probably a result of “antagonistic pleiotropy” which means it was good for us in one environment, but not the one we are in now.
3. NAC boosts our ability to make free T3 when we are under stress. T or F Answer. Bingo. Either you guessed right or you actually read and understood the article above.
4. We make less glutathione as we age. T or F Answer: Double bingo.
5. The right way to fix our low Free T3? (Bonus question) Answer: Get rid of the stress, add selenium and zinc, make sure you have enough iodine, avoid PCBs and dioxins, and take a break from the teenager.

 

Neural Exosomes: Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Early

Neural Exosomes

References: Alzheimer’s DementScience Direct,

Neural Exosomes? Sound like Greek to you? Ever heard of them? You should have. Here’s the scoop. First, they aren’t rare. You have about some 1.2 billion of them per ml of blood. They are tiny little spheres of membrane that have budded off of neural cells. Much like the tiny vesicles that bud off a nerve cell to transmit nerve impulses between cells, exosomes are 2-3 times the size of those packages, and designed to travel further to other cells. Instead of neurotransmitters, they carry RNA instructions. Many come from the brain, but many come from other organs.

What makes them unique is the surface markers on them and the RNA in them, including messenger RNA, mircoRNAs, DNA and signaling proteins. They are not fully functional cells, they are tiny little spheres of membrane, lined/filled with all these unique markers. The range of function that is being proposed for them is that of signaling between cells, moving cellular components, like amyloid precursor protein or messenger RNA. What is known is that you can measure them in quantity and specificity way before you come down with disease. In particular, they show up as much as 10 years before your develop Alzheimer’s. Did you get that? They give you the markers of advance warning.
Now, it’s not just that advance warning they give you. Each exosome has within it a unique pattern of micro RNA and messenger RNA. What are those doing? Did you know that your own chromosomes are actually only 2% coded for your unique genes? That’s it. But did you know that the other 98% isn’t junk? It’s your instruction manual. Messenger RNA is how you send out genetic code about what to do when. This is how your body responds to development as you move from a single egg into a fantastically complicated human. Some of that code is good for you and builds you up. Some of it is like napalm, and attacks the enemy, tearing you down. And,…..here is the critical point. The messenger RNA is also how you send out instructions on how to respond to disease/threat/illness. All disease. Each condition merits different sets of instructions. That means Alzheimer’s will have different proteins in its exosomes than Lyme disease, or pancreatitis, or rheumatoid arthritis, or pneumonia. Another example function, we believe that exosomes are how we clear Amyloid Precursor Protein, APP. Lousy clearance results in accumulation of amyloid in your brain. We call that Alzheimer’s If we can learn how to interpret our Alzheimer’s exosome and how they are different, we can learn how to anticipate and react proactively. Learning how to read exosomes gives us the code to our “instruction manual”.
Now, what is coming is the next miracle. There are companies developing the software to interpret these tests who are just months away from commercial release. With that, we will be able to tell you just what you need to do next. Remember Star Trek’ Dr McCoy and the Magic Wand that would diagnose everything? Yup. That’s it. We are almost there. Maybe not a wand, but an exosome reader. It’s complicated. It is the epitome of “Big Data”.

A point of trivia: do you know how much DNA is in you? Here goes. One cell’s human DNA would stretch out about 2 meters. And considering that we have some 20 trillion cells, one human’s DNA would stretch from the sun, way beyond Jupiter. That’s a lot of DNA. Now, consider that over 99% of the DNA we carry around is actually in our gut in the bacteria of our colonic biome, now we are talking a lot of code that could be in exosomes.
WWW.What will work for me. I’ve finished Bredesen’s Certification Course this week and am just blown away by the possibilities of what we can do to reverse this wicked evil disease. It’s thrilling. And its sad. My 92 year mother with Alzheimer’s is too late to be helped. It makes this Mother’s Day bittersweet. I hope you are able to celebrate with your Mother. In a few months, we will be able to keep her safe from Alzheimer’s. In the meantime, I’m focusing on getting a good night’s sleep. You clear Amyloid much more effectively with good sleep. Maybe that’s why you feel so refreshed when you wake up.

Pop Quiz

 

  1. What is an neural exosome? It’s a little bud off a nerve cell, a bit bigger than the bud that sends neurotransmitters between nerve cells, that travels further between cells, sending messages.
  2. How many neural exosomes do you have? Answer: LOTS. 1.2 billion per milliliter of blood.
  3. What do they carry inside them? Answer: Signaling instructions in the form of RNA, microRNA, proteins.
  4. Is there a different set of exosomes for Parkinson’s versus Alzheimer’s? Answer: YES! A different set for every disease
  5. How much sooner a warning will I get if my exosomes say “Alzheimer’s Condition: Red Alert”? Answer: About 10 years, as best we know now. Much more to come, of course.

 

Simple Bicarb May Help Autoimmune Diseases

Simple Bicarb May Help Autoimmune Diseases

References: J. Immunology,

Fascinating! When you drink simple bicarb (Yes, Arm and Hammer cheap stuff) you send several messages in your body we didn’t know about. The first is to make more acid the next time around to help digest the next meal. And the second is for mesothelial cells on the spleen to signal to all the immune cells inside the spleen to chill out. “Don’t make an immune response.”
What are mesothelial cells? They are the lining of your guts, your abdominal cavity. Every organ is lined with them on the outside. We thought they were there primarily so that the organs can slide over each other with no friction. That feature allows you to move without things being caught up inside. But the surface of mesothelial cells have an interesting feature. They have tiny little fingers called microvilli that signal messages internally to the organ beneath about invasion or intrusion. Mount an immune response, or not!

Here is what this study found. Drinking bicarb for a couple of weeks changed the internal splenic macrophages from a population of mostly M1 macrophages (turn on inflammation) to M2 macrophages (Turn off inflammation). Considering that the spleen is the main repository for immune cells waiting for dispatch, that effect is pretty meaningful. What is unique is that the message is transmitted through the wall of the stomach, via these mesothelial cells, into the wall of the spleen via its mesothelial cells with a result of lowered inflammatory response. Macrophages are typically known for gobbling up garbage from old, dead, dysfunctional tissue and they are some of the first to arrive on the scene in inflammation to clean up the “battlefield” of dead and dying tissue. Autoimmune diseases are thought to be a whole scene of dysfunctional, overreactive inflammation and activation of macrophages. Turning them off is a key thing.

It’s not just macrophages but also Treg cells that get altered with bicarb. Treg cells are supposed to be regulators of immune response and help dial it down. This dialing down is helpful at controlling weird autoimmune reactivity too. And this also occurs because of the messages from those mesothelial cells putting out acetylcholine, acting almost like nerve cells even though they are lining cells of organs. Strange cross over reactivity.

Where does alkaline predilection come from? Through most of human history, we were vegans, starting to eat meat just a few million years ago when our brains started getting bigger and needed animal energy to power them. Animal protein has lots of sulfur in it making for a biological ash of acid when all is digested and done. Plant sourced food ends up making alkali with all the magnesium and potassium salts. Most of our biological processes evolved in an alkaline environment. The range and intricacy of our immune function is all founded on an alkaline milieux. Animal food, hence acid, is new. You can measure this in yourself. Eat a diet of pure green vegetables for a week and measure your urinary pH. It will be above 7. Have some cheese and steak and watch your urine pH plummet to 5.5. Every drug store carries pH sticks you can measure on your own.  Ten servings of vegetables is about 1 tsp of bicarb.  Simple

WWW.what will work for me. Considering how much of the Longevity Diet by Longo is based on vegetables, we may find that part of its power comes from shifting the immune response from inflammatory, to anti-inflammatory. Here is a clue that we are probably all better served with more vegetables. Their alkaline salts help you out. So, I ordered doubled vegetables for dinner last night instead of a potato. Then the blooming onion hors d’oeuvres did me in. I’m not sure it really counts as a vegetable.

 

Pop Quiz

  1. Your internal organs are lined by what type of cells?                         Answer: Mesothelial cells
  2. Mesothelial cells are lined by what cellular feature?                          Answer: Tiny fingers called “microvilli”.
  3. This article says these cells do what?                                                    Answer:  The communicate across organs and down regulate inflammatory immune response
  4. What class of diseases is this particularly useful?                               Answer:  Autoimmune in which there appears to be unregulated inflammation.
  5. You can get the same effect of a tsp of bicarb by eating what type of food?                 Answer:  LOTS of vegetables, green in particular.  Roots won’t do it as well, if at all.