Monthly Archives: April 2018

Fast Mimicking Diet 6: Implications for Coronary Artery Disease

Fast Mimicking Diet 6: Implications for Coronary Artery Disease

References: Whitehall StudyScienceBMJPublic Health NutrAnnals of Int MedBMJ,

Heart attacks are what we die from in America. Fifty percent of us will meet our maker via heart attack, both men and women. It is the penultimate sign of aging, and the last sign for 30% of those who present with sudden death as their first indication of heart disease. We have made huge strides in reducing morbidity and mortality from heart disease in the last 50 years. Longo’s estimate is that we would have roughly 3-4 times the effectiveness on reducing mortality if we focused on enhancing resilience and longevity with the Fast Mimicking genetic program.
Ok, I’m in. Give me the details as they exist now. Let’s start with historical perspective. We know from the Whitehall Study in England that heart disease declines in frequency until your blood glucose is 86. We define diabetes as 124. Hmm. That’s obviously an arbitrary definition made by a committee. The implication is that the lower your glucose is, the less heart disease you will have.

All right. Second concept. The Madison, Wisconsin Rhesus monkey study in which two groups of monkeys were compared with normal diet versus 30% reduction showed that 42% of the normal control diet developed diabetes versus none of the calorie restricted. And cardiovascular disease was reduced 50% in the calorie restricted diet.

What we don’t have is large studies looking specifically at the “Longevity Diet” for coronary artery disease. Instead, we have studies that are close, and probably close enough to be legitimate comparisons. For example, Sofi and Cesari show that adherence to a “Mediterranean Diet” has dramatic reductions in heart disease, Parkinsons, cancer, diabetes. And the closer you adhere to a “Mediterranean Diet” the less heart disease you have. The overlap of “Mediterranean” and Longevity diets is significant. Both are founded on high olive oil, legumes and unrefined cereals, low meat, eggs and cheese, What the Longevity adds is evidence based additions like Time Restricted Feeding with an 11-12 hour feeding window and a 12-13 hour fasting daily, lower animal protein intentionally and lower fruit use.

And the opposite argument is valuable too. If you eat more animal protein and less carbs, as in one arm of the Harvard Professional Health study, you show that mortality doubled from all causes and increased 40% with cardiovascular disease. If low carb but vegetable based, increased CV disease disappeared. Another study from Swedenof 43,396 women showed a 5% increase in cardiovascular disease for each 5 gram increase in protein intake concomitant with a 20 gram decrease of carbs.

Finally, we have Dean Ornish’s and Caldwell Esselstyn’s diets in which folks are kept on extremely low fat, vegan diets. Their patients also showed regression of coronary artery disease. Their limitation is that compliance requires intense discipline, and most folks can’t maintain it.

My conclusion: we have something real here. The challenge is to make it palatable and sustainable. Well, nuts and olive oils are tasty. Fish is pretty good too. Including these fits in the Mediterranean construct, but also matches the behavior of long lived populations like the Okinawans, Greeks of Ikaria, Italians of Calabria, Seventh Day Adventists of California.

WWW.What will work for me. Heart disease is the elephant in the room. It’s what we Americans get. And we get it in proportion to our obesity, and our blood sugar level. I’ve eaten low carb, high protein for two years and ended up with an A1c of 5.9. Low carb is a fine way to lose weight, in the short term. The longer term is now revealed with this new idea: episodic 5 day fasts combined with a low animal protein, high olive oil, high vegetable diet. I’ve switched my breakfast from two eggs to one egg with spinach made in coconut oil.

 

Pop Quiz

 

  1. Increasing animal protein by 5% will increase your risk of heart disease by?             Answer: 5%
  2. Animal protein turns on what “aging” pathway?                                               Answer: The mTOR pathway
  3. At what level of glucose does heart disease no longer occur?                        Answer: 86 (And we define diabetes as 124)
  4. Name key components of the Fast Mimicking Diet.                                        Answer: Daily 12 hour fasting, monthly-quarterly 5 day fasting, low animal protein, high vegetable, low sugar, low refined grains, no trans fat,
  5. The best research studies we have that show the benefit of the Longevity diet looks at what current eating pattern?                                                                                        Answer: The Mediterranean Diet, but we will give you credit for saying Ornish’s or Esselstyn’s too

 

 

Fast Mimicking Diet 5: Cancer and the Magic Shield

Fast Mimicking Diet 5: Cancer and the Magic Shield

References: CellBMC CancerCancer CellPLOS Biology,

Last week we learned about reversing diabetes. This might be the Holy Grail of modern medicine. The prevention and treatment of cancer might be just as important. Cancer frequency increases with age, essentially equating aging with more disease. How to prevent it?
The first key concept is to understand how cancer comes about. It takes a key mutation, or probably several mutations or changes in the DNA sequence of a cell, for the cancer cell to develop “oncogenes”, cancer favoring genes. Cancer cells stop obeying orders, which in fact makes them weaker and more vulnerable to damage from external toxins. This is why Vitamin C, ozone, and many chemotherapy drugs have a deterring effect. It’s as though cancer cells are race cars with the accelerator stuck to the floor: they can’t slow down.

Longo recognized that key characteristic of cancer cells, and the essential response of healthy yeast/worms/mice to the fast mimicking diet. When you deprive healthy cells of key nutrients for a fixed period of time, they recognize that they are in trouble. The “get the memo” and respond by hunkering down. Longo called it the “magic shield”. Cancer cells can’t do that. The cancer cell tries to keep growing, even with no nutrients around.

In an experiment with mice, one of Longo’s graduate students gave mice chemotherapy and compared a group with normal daily diet versus some fed no food for two days prior to the chemo. The differences were striking. The fasting mice were dandy, the normally fed mice all got sick. In a week or two, 65% of the regular diet mice were dead. The same dramatic effects were found when micewith lung cancer were given chemo with or without fast mimicking: the fasting mice had 60-70% remission rates compared to much lower in the normally fed mice.
It appears there are two key dynamics going on with this cancer effect: the first is that the fasting weakens the cancer cells, making them more vulnerable. The second is that it renews and “revs” up the immune system, making it more aggressive against the cancer cells..

And the effects go beyond just making the immune system stronger. The use of potent steroids is a part of many chemo regimens with mixed blessings as the resulting elevation of glucose adds to toxicity. The FMD reduces glucosedramatically, suggesting that the use of steroids should be reconsidered.

Where are we with randomized clinical trials in cancer? Considering that there are several hundred types of cancer scattered all over, it takes a while to conduct studies on any one cancer with this strategy, so there are very few studies completed. The three or four that Longo refers to in his book make the strong argument for safety of the strategy, reduction of side effects, increased ability to complete chemo regimens. With that in hand, Longo suggest the following guidelines in his book. 1. If the oncologist agrees, the patient may fast or do the FMD for three days before chemo and 1-2 days after standard chemo drugs. 2. If fasting, make sure you don’t resume regular eating immediately following the chemo as the rebounding growth of liver cells at a time of lingering blood levels of chemo lead to liver toxicity. Weather it out with fasting at least 24 if not 48 hours after the chemo. And start slowly on vegan food, with lots of olive oil: rice, bread, pasta, vegetables and soups. Finally, try to return to normal body weight between cycles. If on any diabetes drug, please, please consult a knowledgeable physician first.

WWW. What will work for me. And just what do you want to do if you have high risk for cancer? Start by reading Longo’s book. If I had the BRCA gene, I would be doing this diet for the rest of my life. I do have diabetes genes in my genetic code, so I probably will be doing this the rest of my life, just like all of us should be. Your blood tests will tell you how often you should be doing it. In the meantime, I’ve now seen three people with dramatic success in just a few months with their diabetes getting better. Want to join that list?

Pop Quiz

 

  1. The Fast Mimicking Diet is called what by Longo?                                                Answer: The Magic Shield
  2. Cancer cells disobey orders and can’t do what?                                                   Answer: Take their foot off the accelerator and stop growing when there are no nutrients around.
  3. What happens to your immune system against cancer after you FMD?            Answer: Rev Rev.
  4. What’s the likelihood of your doing better if you do FMD while getting chemo? Answer: Fewer side effects and likelihood to get more chemo in you.
  5. Do we want you to lose weight via the FMD when you have cancer?                 Answer: NO! In between cycles we want you to gain it back.